The circular ruins essays

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©1999–2017 Genesis Park. All Rights Reserved.

It should not surprise anyone, at this point, if we argue that Arnold Schwarzenegger is, for us, the ultimate dream-character. He has the ability to morph himself through a variety of cultural identities and to iconicize himself as a living symbol. His many films provide a metaphorical patchwork of cultural referents. His numerous incarnations as fitness guru, politician, international investor and enterpreneur, actor, famous father and husband, restaurateur , and his own survival of several physical maladies all make Schwarzenegger seem larger, and different, than life—an image from a chaotic dream. If our dreams are “the site of an essential energy conversion where 'ignorant' cells turn into smart (or creative) cell groups" (States 1993: 5), then “we” need to face the fact that it is Arnold Schwarzenegger who has become our teacher, the Kindergarten Cop of our narrative lives.

In Jorge Luis Borges ’ well-known story, “The Circular Ruins,” a man sets out to dream a man—perhaps a savior—into existence. The effort requires nothing less than everything. At last, the new man is “born.” The new man survives a terrible fire, proving to his creator that his “son” is immortal. The creator/dreamer then, miraculously, survives a similar catastrophic fire. He, then, realizes, that he, too is a dream. As we have suggested, Arnold quite deliberately set out to dream up himself and has continued to revise his creation regularly. We, too, have spent many nights dreaming Arnold Schwarzenegger and the dreams are still further versions of the dreamed-man. Borges’ story is one of infinite recursion; ours is, we would argue, one of potentially infinite hyper-activity. The dreams beget a man whose life and works beget the dreams.

© 1996–2009, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. ( Copyright Notice )

"I learned more in 10 minutes than 1 month of chemistry classes"

©2017 Project MUSE. Produced by The Johns Hopkins University Press in collaboration with The Milton S. Eisenhower Library.

Made possible by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation
© 2017 Oxford University Press and the National Gallery of Art

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the circular ruins essays

The circular ruins essays

"I learned more in 10 minutes than 1 month of chemistry classes"

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the circular ruins essays

The circular ruins essays

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the circular ruins essays

The circular ruins essays

It should not surprise anyone, at this point, if we argue that Arnold Schwarzenegger is, for us, the ultimate dream-character. He has the ability to morph himself through a variety of cultural identities and to iconicize himself as a living symbol. His many films provide a metaphorical patchwork of cultural referents. His numerous incarnations as fitness guru, politician, international investor and enterpreneur, actor, famous father and husband, restaurateur , and his own survival of several physical maladies all make Schwarzenegger seem larger, and different, than life—an image from a chaotic dream. If our dreams are “the site of an essential energy conversion where 'ignorant' cells turn into smart (or creative) cell groups" (States 1993: 5), then “we” need to face the fact that it is Arnold Schwarzenegger who has become our teacher, the Kindergarten Cop of our narrative lives.

In Jorge Luis Borges ’ well-known story, “The Circular Ruins,” a man sets out to dream a man—perhaps a savior—into existence. The effort requires nothing less than everything. At last, the new man is “born.” The new man survives a terrible fire, proving to his creator that his “son” is immortal. The creator/dreamer then, miraculously, survives a similar catastrophic fire. He, then, realizes, that he, too is a dream. As we have suggested, Arnold quite deliberately set out to dream up himself and has continued to revise his creation regularly. We, too, have spent many nights dreaming Arnold Schwarzenegger and the dreams are still further versions of the dreamed-man. Borges’ story is one of infinite recursion; ours is, we would argue, one of potentially infinite hyper-activity. The dreams beget a man whose life and works beget the dreams.

© 1996–2009, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. ( Copyright Notice )

Action Action

the circular ruins essays
The circular ruins essays

"I learned more in 10 minutes than 1 month of chemistry classes"

Action Action

The circular ruins essays

Action Action

the circular ruins essays

The circular ruins essays

©1999–2017 Genesis Park. All Rights Reserved.

Action Action

the circular ruins essays

The circular ruins essays

It should not surprise anyone, at this point, if we argue that Arnold Schwarzenegger is, for us, the ultimate dream-character. He has the ability to morph himself through a variety of cultural identities and to iconicize himself as a living symbol. His many films provide a metaphorical patchwork of cultural referents. His numerous incarnations as fitness guru, politician, international investor and enterpreneur, actor, famous father and husband, restaurateur , and his own survival of several physical maladies all make Schwarzenegger seem larger, and different, than life—an image from a chaotic dream. If our dreams are “the site of an essential energy conversion where 'ignorant' cells turn into smart (or creative) cell groups" (States 1993: 5), then “we” need to face the fact that it is Arnold Schwarzenegger who has become our teacher, the Kindergarten Cop of our narrative lives.

In Jorge Luis Borges ’ well-known story, “The Circular Ruins,” a man sets out to dream a man—perhaps a savior—into existence. The effort requires nothing less than everything. At last, the new man is “born.” The new man survives a terrible fire, proving to his creator that his “son” is immortal. The creator/dreamer then, miraculously, survives a similar catastrophic fire. He, then, realizes, that he, too is a dream. As we have suggested, Arnold quite deliberately set out to dream up himself and has continued to revise his creation regularly. We, too, have spent many nights dreaming Arnold Schwarzenegger and the dreams are still further versions of the dreamed-man. Borges’ story is one of infinite recursion; ours is, we would argue, one of potentially infinite hyper-activity. The dreams beget a man whose life and works beget the dreams.

© 1996–2009, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. ( Copyright Notice )

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the circular ruins essays

The circular ruins essays

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The circular ruins essays

©2017 Project MUSE. Produced by The Johns Hopkins University Press in collaboration with The Milton S. Eisenhower Library.

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The circular ruins essays

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